Equestrian Blogs > AmazingLady's blogs > Seeing in the Dark - Month 1

Seeing in the Dark - Month 1

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Posted on Apr 06, 2010 at 08:59 AM Total posts: 8
I've had Charlie for over a month now. We had been worried that he would go through separation anxiety, because he had been separated from his friends and sister, who'd been his constant companions since before he went blind. He lost his sight due to Uveitis. Charlie just got used to it and even continued pulling wagons and sleighs with his 'seeing eye sister, Lucy'. I am told kids seemed to be drawn to him, and I'm hoping that's true, because that's what I do. I use horses in therapy and the sport of Vaulting. I have another Belgian, a mare named Tanny, short for Montana Mae. She is the typical Belgian brown with blonde mane and tail. She is huge and powerful and still very green at 8 years old. Charlie is 11 years old and a good two hands shorter than Tanny, but still impressive at 16+! Tanny was a PMU and has a tale of woe herself, but this is Charlie's story, and I will stick to it. I was told that children, especially, were drawn to Charlie when he was out at events or in parades, and I'm counting on that, because that's what I do. I work with horses for therapy and the sport of Vaulting-Gymnastics on Horseback! When Charlie first arrived, it was easy to see that he was blind. Not being in familiar surroundings, he bumped his way around and looked a bit forlorn. Even though he'd been blind since he was 5, he was used regularly, with Lucy, to pull a big wagon, sleigh or plow. Eventually, his former owner acquired other horses to take his place and gave him an early retirement. That's when he became 'an extra mouth to feed', and even though she loved him very much, a bit of resentment began to grow. As I said, I was waiting for the incessant whinnying that some horses perform when they are moved, but Charlie patiently waited to go home, or for things to become 'familiar'. I kept him in the stall next to Tanny to let them get acquainted. She immediately tried to be the boss, but the pipe coral pannel that separated them kept her from pushing him around too much. We had shown him where to expect his water and food to be each day, and he quickly learned the sounds of the routine of feeding, grooming, cleaning, ect. From research I'd done, I'd learned that most blind horses have what's called the "Blind Horse Tilt". Their heads to one side to better catch the sounds of activity around them. Sure enough, Charlie's head to the right, our left as we look at him, whenever he hears the door of the house open or close, the engine of the truck stop when we get home, or even the sounds of our voices through the windows on the few days it was warm enough to open them to let some fresh air inside. He soon became comfortable with his new home.

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Posted on Aug 28, 2011 at 05:12 PM Total posts: 1

THIS IS THE MOST AMAZING THING I'VE EVER SEEN... I HAVE TO MEET THESE ANIMALS AND THIS AMAZING WOMAN!!!

HERE IS MY PRECIOUS RESCUE... FAT AS.... WELL A HORSE, NOW!


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Posted on Dec 01, 2010 at 12:05 PM Total posts: 2
This is awesome! I'm so glad for Charlie!
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Posted on Jul 18, 2010 at 01:45 PM Total posts: 8
Thanks, Talor123!!! We have really made progress with Charlie! Now that school is out, and I have time, and there are a few kids who can come and vault on him, he is doing splendidly! His riding trainer can take him on short trail rides, and he's actually learning to be comfortable. I've chronicled Charlie's progress by giving 'his' vaulting club a page! Go there and see his progress!
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Posted on Jul 17, 2010 at 08:38 AM Total posts: 6
I'm so happy for you and Charlie! You ARE an amazing lady! Keep us informed about Charlie and the wonderful work he is doing. I think you do have a story to tell. It's so wonderful to see people so happy to just be in the presence of a horse. They're our Angels on Earth! They give us confidence and a feeling of freedom that cannot be explained.
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Posted on Jun 08, 2010 at 03:11 PM Total posts: 8
I've had Charlie for 3 1/2 months now! He has come soooooooooooo far! He's in training with a Dressage trainer. I have found some volunteers to help me introduce Vaulting with him. I have started an 'official' club called Blind Horse Vaulters, and, believe it or not, one of my students is blind!!! A blind vaulter on a blind horse! Is this a Hallmark Channel movie or what????? He has adjusted sooooooo well. I am looking for multiple ways of spreading the news about Charlie; he even has a page dedicated to him! Look for Blind Horse Vaulters featuring Blind Charlie! Look for it, ok?

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Posted on May 27, 2010 at 07:17 AM Total posts: 8
Hi Talor! Your friend was right; that's exactly how I started out Charlie's introduction to his 'new home'! LOL However, his buddy turned out to be a bully, so I had to separate them. He is on one side of a pipe corral, and she is on the other! They are still close enough to groom and comfort each other, but she can not steal his food or kick him when he's 'in her space'. He has settled in so well, that he doesn't need that constant companionship anymore. Besides, I keep him very busy with dressage lessons 3x's a week, vaulting training 3x's a week and a day of leisure! He's in 7th Heaven! I need to update my blog and let everyone know how well he's doing! Thanks for writing, Debi and Charlie

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Posted on May 25, 2010 at 11:43 PM Total posts: 6
I read your story and a horse person I met years ago said to find the horse a buddy and tie a bell on the buddy horse. This gives the blind horse a friend a they always know where their friend is and can follow them to pasture to where ever. If you can do this, you can then just let Charlie follow you with the bell. Jingle bells. That way whatever you do with him he'll be comfortable where he is. Good luck..you seem like a very special person. It's rare to find people in this world that have compassion for animals and people. Charlie is there for a reason. Every horse has their purpose in life just like people.
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Posted on Apr 30, 2010 at 04:57 PM Total posts: 8
Hi Clairrie!! Thank you so much for commenting on my blog! I need to add a new installment, since Charlie is adjusting well and starting to get in the routine of training. I realized in my zest to get him healthy and put on a few pounds, I was giving him a feed that was making him 'way too hyper'! So, now that I'm letting it melt out of his system, he is doing much better again! Speaking of admiring talents with horses, yours is a gift i truly hold dear!!! I have seen the work of 'horse helpers', who quietly connect with horses to get them through different things in their lives. Please keep Charlie in your thoughts. Help him to understand that what I'm asking him to do may be strange, but will help his soul and the minds, hearts and souls of the children I introduce him to! He has a purpose in life, and I think he can do more than just eat three times a day and get kisses! Send some positive energy this way, I know it will get here eventually!!! Thanks so much, Debi
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Posted on Apr 25, 2010 at 10:28 PM Total posts: 7
Hi, I think what you are doing is great and that it goes well for you and Charlie, loving horses as I do, and hating to see them suffer, I wish there were more people about like you. I do Natural Healing on animals and people, using the gift's that God or the Higher Power's gave me, so just love to be able to help them where possible, so I will follow your story with great interest. All the best, Clarrie.