Equestrian Blogs > Livetooride's blogs > and 1300# of horseflesh woke up

and 1300# of horseflesh woke up

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Posted on Nov 24, 2008 at 12:24 AM Total posts: 34
I have a 5yr old mare who up until this yr spent her life in pasture with cows unbroke.I brought her home paid for 60days of training to get out buck. Put another 4mo of professional supervised reining lesson. Up until recent she has been pretty solid no scare or jumpyness but lately she just all of a sudden jumps strait up does 360 and takes off.After I sit myself down in the seat I think of options. I tried bending and giving until she settles. and Ive wrode out the run and made her continue at a friends suggest(maybe shes doing it to stop)my question is it possible im pushing her to much mentally with her training. If so do I stop were im at give her a rest or do I just press on with what were doing until her jumpyness leaves.
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Posted on Nov 30, 2008 at 09:53 AM Total posts: 34
Montana Im not ignoring your questions. Im not feeling well. So im staying in bed for awhile.Your questions are so detailed that there a little much to answer when Im under the weather.
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Posted on Nov 28, 2008 at 09:02 AM Total posts: 69
"THE DIFFICULTY I HAVE WITH COLLECTION AND SUPPLENESS IS FROM MY LACK OF STRENGTH NOT HER." Live, I've read through your thoughts, and need to several times more, but like the comment about taking the bucking out the above caught my attention. I may have read something into your comment that doesn't apply to you, but it's an interesting point for discussion. I feel that something very basic is missing if one is relying on his/her own strength to gain collection/suppleness. The use of strength connotes to me a "pulling action on your part. A need to force the horse. I never pull on a horse. I will set and hold a static pressure, which the horse can find a way out of, but that is as different from pulling as asking is to telling. Holding a static pressure does not take strength. When riding, my requests are always done with my little pinky fingers when direct reining. If I need more than that (on a consistent basis) I'm not riding the horse where she is. I need to go back and work on pressure release at a point that she can respond well. This could mean at a slow walk or even at a stand still. Humans are so damned results conscious (driven by ego) and this is what causes rushing the horse and setting braces in the horse. The way that I look at everything I do around a horse is that I am preparing the horse to do what I want in a manner that the horse can find it on her own. By example what I mean by this is I NEVER try to catch a horse, load a horse, cross water with a horse,... stop a horse, steer a horse. I prepare the horse to discover these things on her own and how long it takes depends solely on the unique horse. This is why money damages so many horses. I work as many horses pro bono as I charge my full rate... all according to my assessment of the owner's ability to pay. I tell people that it will take me as long as it takes. If money is an issue but I have confidence in the owner's sincerity and motivation I will train him/her to do the work themselves. If money and time are both an issue I suggest in all sincerity that they should find another interest in their life. Again, I am not inferring any of the above to you. It is obvious that you are putting admirable effort into this horse. I just wonder if you have been pressured by either others or yourself to advance the horse in such a manner that "feel" has been ignored or lost.
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 12:30 PM Total posts: 34
I have a regular VOM out that readjust her. I under stand about sour muscle and fatigued muscles because of my own conditions so when i got to chiro. she goes to VOM.
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 10:43 AM Total posts: 34
I'd be interested in what has been happening with this reining training. You say that she hates the ring. Is it the enclosed environment or the training in general? *** ITS THE THE INCLOSED INVIROMENT. I CAN DO ALL THE MANUVERS OUT IN THE OPEN AND SHE IS PRETTY CONTENT. SHE DOESNT STOMP HER FEET DROP HER SHOULDERS AND BULL ZONE ME OUT OF THE SEAT SHE DOESN'T RUSH AT A GALLOP LIKE LETS GET THIS OVER WITH.*** Does she get along with the trainer? *** THIS WAS A HARD QUESTION HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOUR HORSE LIKES SOMEONE WHO DOESNT HANDLE THEM MUCH??? HERE IS MY THOUGHT WHEN SHE LOOKS AT HIM HER LOOK ISN'T SOFT LIKE WHEN SHE LOOKS AT ME OR ONE OF MY KIDS. ITS NOT HARD LIKE WHEN SHE LOOKS AT A STREY DOG. i THINK SHE FOR THE MOST PART DOESN'T ACKNOWLEDGE HIM UNLESS HE REQUIRES HER TO DO SO. *** Just as a side bar, not meant to cast any aspersions on your trainer, one of the most messed up geldings I've ever worked with was destroyed by one of the most celebrated reining trainers in a certain upscale Colorado town. This sum' bitch took a very sweet young colt with good ground manners and that had been saddle broke to put first rides on and destroyed its mind. Although your horse is coming six she's only been started this year if I have the chronology right. That seems very soon to be pushed into this kind of training. *** IVE TOOK THIS INTO CONSIDERATION ALREADY WHEN NOTICE SHE IS STRUGGLING I MAKE HIM SLOW DOWN OUR PROGRESS. I ALLOW MORE TIME FOR PLAY AND DO NOT MOVE ON UNTIL I FEEL HER MIND IS INTOUCH WITH OUR ROUTINE WE ARE DOING . I REALIZED VERY EARLY ON SHE WAS MENTALLY ABOUT 1.5YRS OLD. UP TO THIS POINT WE HAVE TAUGHT THE BASICS. GIVE YOUR HEAD, SHOULDERS, RIBS, AND HIP. HOW TO BACK AND HOW TO CARRY AND COLLECT HERSELF. ITS ONLY AS OF LATE THAT WE HAVE STARTED INCORPRATEING THE MULITASKING OF QUES. *** I ride a horse for at minimum one year just working in the snaffle before going to the hackamore and another year or more before the two rein, etc. I know that the high dollar bred reiners are started early and put into training at an accelerated pace, but few of them end up having have any "horse sense" outside of a controlled arena. *** I STILL USE A SNAFFLE ON HER AND INTENT TO UNTIL MUCH LATER ON IN HER TRAIING. I DO NOT SEE ANY REASON TO CHANGE BITS AT THIS POINT. THE DIFFICULTY I HAVE WITH COLLECTION AND SUPPLENESS IS FROM MY LACK OF STRANGTH NOT HER. *** As far as hating the arena I don't find that strange considering her history. Most horses raised in open pasture have a rough time in the confines of an arena, especially indoor. I was buying ranch horses down in Cody last spring and it was hilarious that the best ranch broke horses that I wanted to buy for my clients were absolute basket cases in the indoor while the fancy horses trained for showing looked perfect. But not a one of these "good horses" would have been worth a penny where I needed to take them! Needless to say it worked in my favor as the bidding on the ranch broke horses stayed low because they were so agitated and appeared so unruly in the arena. The moneyed Dudes stayed away from those auctions! LOL I'd like to have a description of what happens in your training sessions. *** I MAKE SURE HER SADDLE PAD IS WARM RIGHT OFF I KEEP IT IN MY WARM TRUCK UNTIL I PUT IT ON HER BACK. AS WELL AS HER SNAFFLE BIT. I PLACE THE SADDLE ON HER BACK I DO NOT JUST PLOP IT ON THERE ARE WING IT UP AND LET ALL THE STUFF GET UNDER THE SADDLE. WHEN I CINCH UP THE SADDLE I DO NOT DO SO TIGHTLY AT FIRST JUST ENOUGH SO IT WONT ROLL UNDER HER AS SHE IS ROUND PEN. I ROUND PEN HER FOR THE SAKE OF WARMING UP HER BACK AND HER MUSCLES AND LOOSING UP HER MOVEMENTS. I ALSO LIKE HOW IT PLACES A SADDLE. WHEN I MOUNT BECAUSE OF MY WEEKNESS I HAVE HER SIDESTEP OVER TO THE FENCE AND PLACE MY SELF ONTO HER BACK I NEVER JUST JUMP ON AND LET HER TAKE THE BEATING. WE START OUT IN A WALK MORE FOR ME THEN HER I RELAX TO FEEL HER BEAT AND GET HER GAITE CHECK OUT HOW SHE FEELS AND IF SHE HAS DIFFULCULTY. WILL PUT HER IN HER BENDING EXERCISES AND SEE HOW SUPPLE SHE IS AND GIVING AT THIS POINT IF THINGS GO WELL I WILL USE MY SEAT TO ASK FOR A TROTT COLLECTED IF SHE DOES THINGS AS REQUIRED AND IN A COMPANIONABLY MANNOR WE WILL CONTINUE. IF HOWEVER SHE IS UNRESPONSIVE I WILL MAKE HER WORK. I WILL ASK FOR HER TO CARRY HER RIB CAGE, I WILL ASK FOR HER TO CURVE HER BODY ONE WAY AND TROT THE OTHER I WILL MAKE HER WORK. WHEN SHE DECIDES IT BETTER TO FOLLOW NICELY THEN I LET HER RELAX. I WATCH AND LISTEN TO HER AS I WOULD ONE OF MY YOUNG CHILDREN WHEN I GET THE IDEA SHE HAS HAD ENOUGH WE GO FOR A TRL RIDE USUALLY IN ABOUT AN HOUR. I CONTINUE THE PROCESS OUT ON THE TRL. WITH ONLY ONE DIFFRENCE IM TO WEEK TO KEEP HER AT A CONTROLLED COLLECTED CANTER IN A CIRCLE SO THIS I DO NOT DO OUT OF THE ARENA. IM WORKING ON IT. ITS A WORK IN PROGRESS. WHEN SHE FINALLY STARTS TO RELAX. I EASE UP AND WORK ON HER GIVING HER HEAD. SHE SEEMS TO LIKE TO KEEP IT. AT THE END OF OUR RIDE I COMB HER OUT GOOD USUALLY SIT AROUND WITH HER AT MY SHOULDER AS WE WATCH ANOTHER LESSON OR A HORSE BEING WORKED UNTIL WE GO HOME.*** On the physical side of things I'd pick Almost's brain. Her post is right on the money. I would investigate your saddle more than the pad. I WILL INVESTIGATE THE SADDLE INFO AND ..... UNTIL LATER
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 09:41 AM Total posts: 69
I'd be interested in what has been happening with this reining training. You say that she hates the ring. Is it the enclosed environment or the training in general? Does she get along with the trainer? Just as a side bar, not meant to cast any aspersions on your trainer, one of the most messed up geldings I've ever worked with was destroyed by one of the most celebrated reining trainers in a certain upscale Colorado town. This sum' bitch took a very sweet young colt with good ground manners and that had been saddle broke to put first rides on and destroyed its mind. Although your horse is coming six she's only been started this year if I have the chronology right. That seems very soon to be pushed into this kind of training. I ride a horse for at minimum one year just working in the snaffle before going to the hackamore and another year or more before the two rein, etc. I know that the high dollar bred reiners are started early and put into training at an accelerated pace, but few of them end up having any "horse sense" outside of a controlled arena. As far as hating the arena I don't find that strange considering her history. Most horses raised in open pasture have a rough time in the confines of an arena, especially indoor. I was buying ranch horses down in Cody last spring and it was hilarious that the best ranch broke horses that I wanted to buy for my clients were absolute basket cases in the indoor while the fancy horses trained for showing looked perfect. But not a one of these "good horses" would have been worth a penny where I needed to take them! Needless to say it worked in my favor as the bidding on the ranch broke horses stayed low because they were so agitated and appeared so unruly in the arena. The moneyed Dudes stayed away from those auctions! LOL I'd like to have a description of what happens in your training sessions. On the physical side of things I'd pick Almost's brain. Her post is right on the money. I would investigate your saddle more than the pad. The best pad can't compensate for an improperly fitting saddle. I want my saddles to fit comfortably with a bare minimum of padding, often just a doubled wool blanket. (It's a shame that Ugly Sheep out of Buffalo, WY went out of business; they made the best) Definitely do the wet saddle blanket test that Almost speaks of. A fellow in Bozeman called me about a horse that started bucking out of the blue this summer. I really screwed up by not thoroughly combing through his fleecy cool back pad. I recommended some typical round pen diagnostics that he spent a couple weeks on without much real change. In fact the horse started hunching up earlier and earlier on. Then I got a call down in Wyoming one evening with the solution he had discovered. One of his friends had an epiphany. She got the horse's fleece pad and thoroughly combed her finger nails through it and found a hidden burr! Immediately the behavior stopped. However, there was according to the owner some residual reticence by the horse to be saddled that he's working on. The horse would move away just as you describe your mare doing on that last ride with your daughter. A physical irritation can just sour the horse and make her distrustful of you. Her whole world can turn south in the spiral Almostannie describes and things that were no big deal before can become frightful with the mood change. As far as western saddles go I like the wade trees because they fit so many different shapes of horses. They were developed in the rough country of the Pacific Northwest as they are stable in the ups and downs, and of course they're the most stable when roping in real ranch work, which is a litmus test. I believe that too many people focus on the wrong thing in a saddle: going for lightness thinking that's better for the horse. If you really do the numbers you'll see that relative to the horse's weight even ten pounds more is negligible. I want a sturdy bombproof saddle that will carry my weight with stability on the horse. She'll like that. Imagine if you have to carry a few bowling balls up a mountain in a backpack. Would you want a feather light frameless book pack or a heavy internal frame pack? I'd take the latter. My saddle weighs in at probably 35 pounds or more alone not counting a 60? lariat and saddle bags. Too many people are influenced by marketing to buy these feather light saddles, usually sporting some revolutionary "system". The marketing is focused on the human's emotions not on the horse's preference. (Sort of like these gourmet dog foods. I never could get Charlie to eat this crap that I bought him for Christmas one year.) In EVERY instance where we've noticed a client's horse was upset by carrying the human on the light weight saddle he/she wore, when I threw on my behemoth for them to ride the horse was very happy. If I had a nickel for every wade saddle that my clients have ensuingly bought from Cyd down at the Bozeman Saddle Outlet?
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 08:39 AM Total posts: 69
Excellent post Almost. You describe perfectly an Andalusian that was sent up here from Santa Barbara two years ago. Carried himself perfectly when just standing around or grazing but as soon as you'd move him out he'd wring his neck and throw his jaw. The owner didn't address it. The spiraling effect took over and she (the owner) by all accounts spent a lot of time this summer hiking out of the mountains. As we say, "the punishment for a horse that acts up and bucks is that he has to run home all alone". I for one would sure like to hear a lot of your wisdom on these physical issues. I'm a huge fan of chiropractics. There are many excellent practitioners out our way. I've seen instant turn arounds following a couple adjustments.
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 08:17 AM Total posts: 69
Fault? There ain't no such thing as fault here Darlin'! Everybody that I've seen on here has the best interests of the horse in mind - well, with the exception of a team roper type last year, and he was pretty short lived on this forum. When you're working with horses Murphy's Law rules and we all just get by the best we can with what we know. That's why one needs to hear so many points of view, then you can let your intuition sort through the chaf and come to your own conclusions.
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 07:22 AM Total posts: 34
Yes not if we could only learn how to ship each other through the ISP servers so as to get hands on advise when needed. I still cant find anyone around here who knows how to properly fit a saddle to my horses. This is what Ive tried though I follow the underneith of the saddle with my hands at the withers making sure every part follows her body line. The I put my hand under her saddle at point of shoulder area raise that legs to see if any pinching or major pressure develops there. I allow for room in the gullet area (i think thats the word. area under saddle horn) and make a swell in blankets and still she made her back sore. I know their are ways to measure gullet sizes im not sure how. I do know however if I go down to these stores and say i have a horse who as a 5.25 gullet (i measured with templates) I get arguments about this template being diffrent the that temp and so forth. I know each horses back is made diffrent some or more muscled over withers some have shorter backs, some have a diffrent slop to their back causing the saddle to put more pressure on the withers and loin of a horses back. I try to have this conversation with experts up here and I get the most incredable look. First of all their eyes glaze over then they fall asleep. my favorite one is when they give me a long drawn out lecture of how in the old day these cowboys had to ride many diffrent horses with the same saddle so all that info doesn't matter sos keep it simple. I know I went from tack store to horse person to figure out what was causing my horses soreness on her whithers. Funny thing is we have a litral drunk up here who used to be a pro reiner ive talked to him from time to time at work we give each other a bad time. he is the one who gave me some idea about how to help her back.
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Posted on Nov 27, 2008 at 05:42 AM Total posts: 353
Almostannie. LOL! Yes, when you copy text those marks magically appear. I think there is a faerie that does this... So when you copy anything with this company you will need to go right back and change all those signatures... Live, you have gotten many great thoughts and opinions so far. Is'nt it wonderful to be able to come to a place like this and have so many comments to help you?

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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 10:54 PM Total posts: 223
Question marks seem to be representing apostrophes, quotation marks, dashes, etc. Don't know where they came from. :-)
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 10:51 PM Total posts: 223
Hello again Livetoride, First off - I missed your wasp posting completely. I was wondering why the bee issue came up. I also missed your sore wither post (I had written my comment on a word document, then pasted it in the comment box the next day without looking to see if other comments had been posted). My apologies. Duh! I'm new to this blogging stuff. Have either of your trainers ever trail ridden her? If possible could you to have one of them ride her out several times? (in your saddle) If she's behaving the same way with him, then I'm inclined to go back to looking for something physical. Coming from the groom?s perspective (professional groom - not a stall technician), many physical problems start in the least expected places. Almost 60% of a fit horse?s body weight is the muscular system. When a horse is having trouble - either mental or physical, we look at him, feel his legs, check his vital signs, worry about our riding, etc. Very rarely are we thinking the problem began with deep tissue issues. For instance - there?s a long very thin muscle which runs down the middle of a horses neck from his poll to mid shoulder. When riding he may start off just being fussy with his head. Then he?ll resist bending his neck in the opposite direction. Then he may start to ?cop an attitude.? He?ll continue on a down ward spiral - you?ll start thinking his shoulder is sore, and it could well be. His stable manners may be perfect. When he?s just standing around he can hold his head where it?s most comfortable for him. When you start asking him to bend or flex at the poll or just turn - he?s going to hurt. He?s not going to give you what you?re asking for. You add more pressure, he resists more, you insist more, he tenses more???you get the picture. Essentially the domino effect. Other things are going to start hurting, his frustration level is going to skyrocket and you then get an explosion. All because of one thin little muscle in his neck. (and he?s got lots more throughout his entire body that can trigger similar chain reactions) This may not be his problem. I don?t know what?s available to you in Idaho, but there are several equine massage therapists and vets who also practice chiropractics and acupuncture in our area. They can do some pretty remarkable things. I?m not talking about a ?resort? massage, but deep tissue work more along the lines of physical therapy. It can make a world of difference. Because you have pain issues as well, he may be trying to compensate any balance issues you may have. It happens a lot. I hope this helps. Best of luck
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 09:09 PM Total posts: 34
Well this did not take as long as I thought. Intersting how it takes a horse for us to truely find out about ourselves. to quote You: The buck is an expression of fear, frustration and uncertainty, which must then be dealt with. I'd prefer to have minimized these natural reactions before putting my seat in the saddle for the first time. From my coversations with Jack this mare bucked. And she wasn't just pouting. Ive watched his training from beginning to end. Jack does have a routine so minimize the above reactions. But Ive also noticed sometimes he rushes things. Im not complaining this is just a fact and a point to remember. The bee stings. there wasn't much I could do about her steping into an underground wasp nest. I got her to move away from there as fast as I could but she wanted to stop and fight the critters. The saddle sore was my fault. I did notice the soreness. I understood there was a need to change something Ill have to admit the saddle and saddle pad came to mind. When I asked for info in this matter I was told that things were fine and she would just have to toughn up. Enstead of listening to what I knew. I trusted someone else over myself who should have known better.
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 07:59 PM Total posts: 34
Quoting author: BTW... if she spins a 360 isn't she going where you wanted in the first place??!!! Just messing with you! :):)

only if I stay in the saddle other wise im sitting on the groud not going anywere.
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 07:57 PM Total posts: 34
Im have read your comment montana and am going to think on it for a bit to get my mind around all the info. so if I don't answer for a few days its because im still thinking. Thank you .
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 06:42 PM Total posts: 353
LOL!!!! Mr. Montana. That is soooooo funny. Oh, my. I am still laughing... "BTW... if she spins a 360 isn't she going where you wanted in the first place??!!!"

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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 05:27 PM Total posts: 69
BTW... if she spins a 360 isn't she going where you wanted in the first place??!!! Just messing with you! :):)
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 04:55 PM Total posts: 69
Livetoride, There is a lot going on here and it took me several passes through your postings to get a handle on it. My understanding is that this horse was turned out with cattle for four years with minimal human interface. At the beginning of the fifth year you started her for the first time with 60 days of general training followed by four months (how many days each week?) of professional reining training. You began the reining training because the horse seemed dull to you and you wanted to give her a job to boost her spirits and liven her up? The mare behaved very well in all trail riding circumstances until the past six weeks when this bolting and fearfulness appeared. This behavior has developed after the four months of reining training and I assume the training is continuing? There have been two obvious circumstances of physical trauma: 1) the withers was sored at some point and they seem healed, at least to your touch, 2) the horse was stung 17 times while frozen at a standstill (during the six week period that is in question?) You have experimented with nutritional changes trying to find the right balance. Does this about cover it all? I have read your words carefully, but if I have misinterpreted some or taken them out of context I sincerely apologize in advance. Sometimes we never know exactly what causes a horse to make changes in later life, but you've put some real thought into this and we'll work with what we do know. I've jotted down my thoughts and opinions below. Hopefully others will either fill them in or challenge them with superior views. I gather that the 60 days of starting were successful on the surface, but perhaps not so at a much deeper foundation, which I will call the spirit turning loose to the human. This is the essence of starting a horse in my opinion. Without it you just have "training" in its basest form. You said 60 days to take the buck out. It may just be words, but that means something to me. Tom always said that he wanted to keep the buck "in" the horse! LOL. But to your point I would expect it to take only the first day of starting to achieve what you are aiming at with this comment. I expect to have the horse ready to swing a leg over before the first time that I do. (Beyond instances of a bit of brief crow hopping I;ve never had one buck on me during the first ride.) My point is that if my motivation is to "take the buck out" I will probably get what I'm looking for...buck. The buck is an expression of fear, frustration and uncertainty, which must then be dealt with. I'd prefer to have minimized these natural reactions before putting my seat in the saddle for the first time. (For the horse's benefit as well as mine... I'm 57!) There is nothing better for the lifelong spirit of the horse than to have taken the time and care to prepare her sufficiently so there are no unpleasant hurdles for her to surmount. I believe that horses never forget, neither the bad nor the good. If a horse had to be "worked through" this there will always be a kernel of doubt and mistrust of the human as a leader that can emerge later in life...developing dangerous behavior seemingly out of nowhere. Was the person who started your mare the same reining instructor that you are using? I am inclined to cut him some slack. The comment that, "a horse does what you tell it" is of course ridiculous, or as Starhorse puts it in her entertaining way is... "in your dreams". But we all get trapped in our own cliches from time to time and I'll give him the benefit of the doubt. However, I will say that most horses will eventually try their hardest - within the limitations of their natural ability - to do what you want by "asking" them in a clear manner that they understand. HUGE difference. Something hasn't been right in that ring... Not being there none of us on this site can comment on the specifics, but the training has been damaging your mare's self-confidence and confidence in you - that you as a leader will protect her and not put her in life threatening situations. Bolting as you describe it indicates that she knows she needs to take things into her own hands. If it was an expression of being spoiled you wouldn't be able to bring her back as easily as you claim. Eventually, if not accepting of your leadership they will become afraid of being afraid. And that's where it gets irrational and dangerous. I'll continue... time to cook up some dinner.
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 12:51 AM Total posts: 34
Quoting author: Live, Try this to strengthen your left side, it is much harder than it sounds. It will even out your riding position and possibly help you with your physical issue. Only do this on a safe horse. All you need to do is drop your right stirrup, and ride with your foot in only the left. At first you will be shifting your seat often....than less as your seat gets more balanced. You will notice when you pick up your right stirrup that it will feel too short. This will happen until you have a balanced position that starts in your seat and there is even weight on both of your feet in the stirrup. (I will post an article I wrote on this later)

I would love any help you can provide. I have worked hard so most can not tell that I have issues on my left side. They damaged my spinal column and now I am missing a majority of strength and some feeling. I can fool most people on my feet but don't seem to fool a horse in the saddle they will always fight my left side when they want to act up. However even when they don't my ques are not the same from the left to the right. I should say I can't tell if they are the same but I notice most horses react more efficently to my right sided ques then my left sided ques. Like when im cantering in large are small circles and need to do a flying lead change right side no problem left side the horse goes off circle and refuses the lead change repeatedly. There are a number of ways they attach my left side when im riding. Learning to think out of the box to counter balance is the problem. Like when my instructor whats me to do a shoulder turn off my left leg he doesn't allways get it we might need a diffrent opt. for a que.One day I used my rein on the left should in the shoulder turn because she just refused and she want going to win that war.He was upset, *its not about quickness at this point its about precision.* I pointed out unless she knew that I could make her we would never get percision we were getting no were but ripping my left side apart. I gave her an option do it off my leg or I will repeatedly fling this rein at your shoulder until you move. I have to remember when it comes to riding instructors they do not see the wrong with my left side it looks and form there opionon acts like my right. They forget.
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Posted on Nov 26, 2008 at 12:27 AM Total posts: 34
Quoting author: Live, Your instructor is wrong...horses do not always do what we tell them. Maybe in our dreams...

I agree. He and I have repeat conversations inre to his word is not gospel. Funny thing is despite my repeate questions and my firm beliefs in what I know.( I mostly have a open mind to horses and ppls point of views. however there are some things I just know like I know I must breath to live. These I don't back down from. ie: horses are not as stupid as most would like to think.) Im still his favorite pupil. He is like my big brother and we act like it.