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Any ideas on a bucking horse.

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Posted on Feb 01, 2007 at 12:36 AM Total posts: 24
Good for you , excellent result , apartnershipn the making, when you have him going as you would like him to and when he is happy about you being the alpha male of the partnership then move on to more contact with reins and legs and then maybe a canter or even two without a battle.Great stuff.
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Posted on Jan 31, 2007 at 03:35 AM Total posts: 34
Thanks, Well we have started off on the right foot, (so to speak ). I rode Mack today after work and it was a very pleasant experience. It was a great evening, I first started by giving him a big cuddle and brush, I then ?pushed? him out of his paddock, ( using Clinton Anderson?s methods ). Ie: stand at least 4 feet on his near side next to his shoulder and point where I wanted him to go?.. It was great he just moved on wherever I pointed him, lead nice and slack?.. very pleasing. I honestly believe he DOES know more than me. Anyway, saddled him up and spent 2 hours, walking, one rein stopping then trotting and one rein stopping etc etc etc. At first he was not that willing to obey but I just kept on going and by the end he was very understanding and knew exactly what I wanted. ( I must be doing something right ?. Hee hee ). This was ALL done on a very loose rein which made it tedious, but at the end of the day it worked so well. Didn?t even bother about a canter, not going to until we are both very comfortable with the walk, trot, etc etc etc ?. It is amazing how nice a feeling one gets when it all comes together and you start seeing results.
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Posted on Jan 31, 2007 at 03:26 AM Total posts: 24
Longrein, hope you and your mate get it together and form a good working partnership as its no fun riding when you have to be on your guard all the time and trying to keep one step ahead of your mount. We have a young horse here a beautiful looking A S H, just a 3yr old but not broken by us and had been thoroughly spoilt for 12mths after his initial breaking, he can be an angel one day and then the next time he goes out try to ditch you into the nearest bush. Lots of lunging to supple him and teach him to go forward without a rider while staying in frame has helped him enormously and he's been sucessful at shows and has attended pony club camp as an instructors mount, but after a spell its back to square 1.Hopefully as he matyures more he might become more consistent because when he's working well he is just stunning and really quiet.
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Posted on Jan 30, 2007 at 08:32 AM Total posts: 1
Have you lounged this colt before getting on? I attended a Clinton Anderson clinic where he taught lounging for respect! It was very insightful. He also does lots of suppling exercises before he asks them to lope. Good luck!
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Posted on Jan 30, 2007 at 04:47 AM Total posts: 34
Dragonlady, I here what you are saying, personally I believe it may be a combination of things. Admittedly I may not be the best, most experienced horseman around, and please don't get me wrong, but I have been riding since I was 5. So I believe although I may be being a bit soft with him, I am not treating him with silk gloves. So I believe it is more along the lines that he may be 1). Testing me and 2). After such a long spell, he just doesn't want to work and/or he is out of condition with stiff muscles.. Failing this he may have a muscular complaint. As I mentioned I will be doing some more work with him and not being so soft, as I am now aware of this 'behaviour' I will be able to place more attention on exactly when he acts this way. Like Montana said I may have pushed him into too tight a circle. I am now going to be more aware of what I am asking him to do. After all this, he still chooses to behave in this manner I will look at my other options, ie:- Having an experienced person 'check' him out and then a friend who does 'Bowen' therapy. I know he is not a Malicious animal and he is well educated. This is also a learning curve for me to pay more attention to what i am asking him to do. Thanks for your comments, I do appreciate everything everyone is saying. Will keep this blog posted as to any progress.
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Posted on Jan 30, 2007 at 03:42 AM Total posts: 24
Hi Longrein, as your horse is 12 yrs and definately not a baby, his behaviour could be coming from quite a few different directions. 1 learned bad behaviour from a previous owner, 2 not nearly enough lunging before riding after a largish spell and it may be in his nature to crowhop a bit when first brought into work. 3 just a spoilt bad attitude and you may be a bit soft on him or you may not have a lot of experience and he could be taking advantage of you or 4 he might have a physical problem [eg] teeth, muscular chiropractic etc, if you have an experienced HORSEPERSON handy to help out try that or failing all that send him to someone to sort out and ride him there to get used to which buttons work for both of you, good luck and hopefully happy riding!
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Posted on Jan 30, 2007 at 03:42 AM Total posts: 24
Hi Longrein, as your horse is 12 yrs and definately not a baby, his behaviour could be coming from quite a few different directions. 1 learned bad behaviour from a previous owner, 2 not nearly enough lunging before riding after a largish spell and it may be in his nature to crowhop a bit when first brought into work. 3 just a spoilt bad attitude and you may be a bit soft on him or you may not have a lot of experience and he could be taking advantage of you or 4 he might have a physical problem [eg] teeth, muscular chiropractic etc, if you have an experienced HORSEPERSON handy to help out try that or failing all that send him to someone to sort out and ride him there to get used to which buttons work for both of you, good luck and hopefully happy riding!
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Posted on Jan 29, 2007 at 10:59 PM Total posts: 34
Hi guys, Firstly thank you all so much for your comments. I am really taking them in. OK I will try to shed some more light on what is happening. Mack is a 12 yo, whom from what I can gather has only been ridden about 4 times in the last 12 months. As I have mentioned before I believe the whole problem to be me, (as much as I hate to admit it.... hee hee ). I have decided NOT to use the Hackamore, at this stage. I am riding him with a snaffle, it fits nicely and I feel the problem is not with my tack. So, as you correctly pointed out Montana, I am being too enthusistic. Yes I believe when I turned him it was too sharp a turn and also the 'buck' was more like a 'crowhop'. The head just went down, the bum came up and over I went. My fault, not ready, not expecting. So my plan now is to put the Clinton Anderson book away, saddle up Mack and give us a chance to get to know each other. No fancy tricks, nothing special. I'm sure his muscles are stiff due to lack of ride and it was quite rude of me to push him hard. I will do exactly as you have suggested, slow easy trots, building up so he transitions into a canter (lope). Then, not expect him to turn on a 'dime'. He is probably not at riding fitness and this 'gentle' work will bring him on. Once I am happy with this, then I will look into increasing the workload. As far as everything else with Mack is going..... it's great. his attitude on the ground can't be questioned He is slowly becoming my teacher. So, I am really looking forward to riding him this W/E. I will let you know how I go.
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Posted on Jan 29, 2007 at 09:51 AM Total posts: 69
Longrein, I missed your comment that it's in turns that this happens. Is he picking up the correct lead going into the turn? I'm assuming that you're already in good balance yourself. You might check out his balance to begin with by loping very large circles and progressively tighten them, drop to a trot or have him skip over a log at the lead change into the opposite direction in your figure 8. It takes a lot of sluething to get to the bottom of these things.
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Posted on Jan 29, 2007 at 07:27 AM Total posts: 69
This is the most common issue that I have been presented with by folks with younger horses. I forget, Longrein, how old is this fellow? Last spring I was asked to commit time with a perfect sweetheart who threw his head and crowhopped when asked to transition from a trot to a lope (canter). I watched the owner ride and noticed that she collected the reins a bit, nothing excessive, but when she felt the horse hunch up she really put on the brakes while stepping on the accelerator at the same time. Before I mounted "Flossy" I checked the tack and found that one cheek of the snaffel was frozen up causing the joint in the bit to press into his tongue with only the slightest lifting. Of course when he reacted against this she really let the dogs out and he crow hopped. (btw,I've found that you have to define bucking. 99% of what many folks call bucking is just a crow hop which is an expression of frustration, or uncertainty. Few people have ever experienced a real tornado. :) I put my own rig on this guy and - problem solved. The lady has never had a problem since with her new snaffel on her headstall. Not suggesting that this is your problem, but these tack issues with a new horse are a first place to look. She could have saved 500 miles of my traveling expense!!! But more often I've found that these younger horses just get lost in transitions. You've read my comments on these blogs stressing "going slow" many times. I really believe in this. I usually work on the transition by gradually increasing the energy at the trot until the horse "finds the need" to break into the lope, and then back off, letting him settle back to the trot after only a lope or two. Then repeat. The important thing I'm looking for is "setting up the possibility" of the transition and then LETTING HIM FIND IT. Never pushing him through it. This is such a great topic for conversation. I'm looking forward to everyone sharing their experiences and a good discussion.
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Posted on Jan 28, 2007 at 03:58 PM Total posts: 13
longrein, which bridle are you using. Is he bucking with the snaffel? or are you using the hackamore? Put him in the tack he likes and see if he does it then. Look at what you are doing at the canter. Some people ride fine at the walk and trot, but choak up at the canter, hang on the reins or lean forward. Be sure you are sitting back and straight at the canter and that you are not interfearing with his head motion. If you are holding his head at the canter and you ask for a turn, that will make the outside rein pull harder as he bends for the arc. Understand? Whenever a horse goes nicely at one gate and shows annoyance at another, the first place to look at is the rider.
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Posted on Jan 27, 2007 at 08:32 PM Total posts: 2
is he still a baby? he may never have been taught how not to buck. to start a horse at a canter only go uphill at first-he won't be able to buck then. or i was told to sadle in a sturdy sadlle and put the reins around the back and lunge at a canter - this will prevent him from being able to put his head down. it seemed mean so i didn't try it but, it apparntly works.
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Posted on Jan 27, 2007 at 04:45 PM Total posts: 1
hi longrein--that QH is just acting normal for a horse that hasn't been ridden for a long while. Longeing him in the round pen will take some of the buck out of him-then saddle and ride him. When horses like him break into a lope is when they'll bury their heads and buck. If you have to, dally the reins around the saddle horn to keep him from taking his head away you. Don't let him take control of his head or he'll turn you into an airplane!! Good Luck--chahtagal, an old cowgirl.
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Posted on Jan 27, 2007 at 12:46 PM Total posts: 5
I have had the same problem with a 4 yr QH I bought. Rode her, bucked me twice, last time a year ago and really hurt me - lasted months. Since then only rode a month ago, in an arena, with a friend holding reins. Some told me respect. But when I walk the pasture with her, she is wonderful. Also if they have dental problems, can cause to buck. Mine found out went blind in one eye and might have not known whom got on her (moon blindness). Found out she bucked a lot before I bought her so think it is just respect - more ground work and show her whom is boss. Also if they start bucking, pull the reins to get her head to one side or other. That way suppose to disengage hind quarters and can not buck with head to the side. Have not proven this yet.