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Nez Perez Appaloosas......Gaited or not?

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A friend of mine breeds Appaloosa Sport Horses. When I switched to gaited horses I revealed to her some research that lead me to believe that the Nez Perez Apps where gaited. Does anyone have any info they would like to share on this?

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he Nez Perce Horse is a spotted horse breed of the Nez Perce tribe of Idaho. The Nez Perce Horse Registry (NPHR) program began in 1995 in Lapwai, Idaho and is based on cross-breeding the old-line Appaloosa horses (the Wallowa herd) with an ancient Central Asian breed called Akhal-Teke.[1] This program seeks to re-establish the horse culture of the Nez Perce, a tradition of selective breeding of Appaloosa horses and horsemanship that was destroyed in the 19th century. The breeding program was financed by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, the Nez Perce tribe and a nonprofit group called the First Nations Development Institute, which promotes such businesses.

The Nez Perce Horse is "fit to carry the Nez Perce name," according to Rudy Shebala, director of the Tribe’s Horse Registry and the Nez Perce Young Horsemen program.[2]

The Akhal-Teke is an ancient breed that originated in Turkmenistan (near Afghanistan). They are known for their superb endurance and "metallic" coats. The Akhal-Teke coat colors commonly include duns, palominos, buckskins, and dark bays. A typical Nez Perce Horse is a buckskin or palomino with Appaloosa characteristics—mottled skin with a spotted coat or a blanket.

The Nez Perce Horse's conformation is longer and leaner than the Quarter Horses or other stock horses of the Western U.S., with narrower shoulders and hindquarters, a longer back, and a lean runner's appearance. They excel at long rides and compete well in endurance races; they're also excellent jumpers. The Nez Perce Horses are often "gaited," with a fast and smooth running walk.

The Nez Perce say that the horse has attitude—they "allow" people to ride them! The Nez Perce people are historically known for their selective horse breeding practices, according to NPHR breeders Jon and Rosa Yearout.[3] "We strive to follow the lead of our ancestors and carry on their legacy and traditions."
I hope this helps..........
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The indian shuffle, was indeed, a gait of earlier appaloosas:)
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Woodroe, I believe you have to ride a reg. App on the ride. I can ride for hours several days in a row on my horse but not on a horse that trots. Thanks for the offer though
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1 year ago
Quoting author:
The mixing of the draft makes sense. My friends horses are big in body and bone.
Is the Indian Shuffle done by the Tiger Horse or by other breeds?

As far as I know that is a referance unique to the Palouse and Leopard is the coloring of a Appy that doesn't have the full blanket the and is white with spots slightly showing up over the horse unlike the one in Stars picture. Not all horses will have the draft largness I suppose the smaller oned are what the consider pure with blooslines going back 5 generations...

That is the Chief Joseph Trailride and they only ride small small sections of it each yeat. I have an Nez Perce ladys e-mail and number if you are intrested and would like to take the ride some year she has been involved for many years.
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The mixing of the draft makes sense. My friends horses are big in body and bone.
Is the Indian Shuffle done by the Tiger Horse or by other breeds?
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There's a ride every year to honor them and the trek they took. I think it is called the Chief Joseph trailride. They definately where incredible
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View author's info
1 year ago
Quoting author:
A friend of mine breeds Appaloosa Sport Horses. When I switched to gaited horses I revealed to her some research that lead me to believe that the Nez Perez Apps where gaited. Does anyone have any info they would like to share on this?

Hay 4beatgirl,

It's known as the Indian Shuffle the timing isn't even making it a broken four beat gait but it is really smooth on the horse and rider that's why they are called a hundred mile a day horse. The Spanish abandon some spotted horses in Mexico (Spanish Jennet) and they migrated north. When Lewis and Clark passed through the Nez Perce in 1806 he recorded they had the largest horse herds on the continent. The original name was Palouse Horse and evolved to Appaloosa.

The white horse in one of my pictures Apache is a Leopard Appaloosa. He was huge and I have always thought like Star mentioned he had a bit of draft. Their calmness, stamina and go make for a really great mountain horse he was surefooted as a mountain goat and you needed something like that on the Continental Divide. Down on the flat land he was as good as any quarter horse, I could have him dong 40 miles an hour and bring him up and turn him on a dime and he never had a bit in his mouth, just the bridle.

He was 37 when he went on and never really showed it.

We had one hell of a good time and I miss him...

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Hi, 4beat. I had not heard about this, but who knows. The Nez Perez Appalooas where incredible! Did you know they led the Calvary all the way up through Canada before they were finally captured? The Calvary changed to fresh mounts many times, and could not keep up with their "pallosa" ponies...Needless to say, this really upset our Calvary

As a result the government passed a law that all the Nez Perez Appaloosas (they had another name then. I forgot..) had to be crossed with draft horses, maybe mules also... This was an actual law! So very few remained pure after this law was enacted.

Looks like you just upgraded to a star. Congratulations! Now we are going to get into more trouble here...

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